Tag Archives: Online Communities

#carinapitch Carina Press Twitter Pitch event is on NOW. Have a novel to pitch?

The Carina Press editorial team will be holding a pitch event on Twitter via the #carinapitch hashtag on Thursday, April 4, 2013 from 8am Eastern to 9pm Eastern.

Reblog from Carina Press– Angela James | March 30th, 2013

Last fall, we provided an opportunity for authors to submit their work and get both an expedited response and feedback. We had tremendous response to that submissions call, so we decided to do something that would give authors the chance to get similar feedback and response time. I’d also like to share that, from that submissions call, we found over a dozen manuscripts that we either wanted to acquire or see further revisions for, so it was very successful for both authors and us in that regard. Our ultimate goal is always to find new authors to acquire, not new authors to reject!

Last time, we heard from authors who had submissions pending that they wished they could also have the opportunity to take advantage of that, so we’ve come up with a pitch event that will allow everyone, including those who currently have submissions pending, the same chances. Please read on for details of how the event will work.

On Thursday, Carina Press freelance editors will be monitoring the #carinapitch hashtag for book pitches from authors.

The benefits:

Book pitches chosen by editors will be reviewed by the editor who requested it. Response will be given by May 31st, 2013 and those manuscripts chosen via the #carinapitch will also receive personalized feedback. Please note that we ask authors not to expect paragraphs of feedback, but specific feedback will be offered noting what the editor sees as not working or needing attention. We also would like to emphasize that the nature of this business is subjective, so the editor may provide feedback the author may not agree with. We’re offering insight into why the book doesn’t work for us (should we choose to pass on it, rather than acquiring, which is certainly a possibility!), not providing detailed instructions on how to “fix” any issues we see.

Eligibility to participate:

1) A complete, ready-to-send, manuscript that falls within the commercial fiction genres that we publish. (Please view our submissions guidelines here)

2) You must be prepared to send your manuscript within 3 days of the #carinapitch session. Any manuscripts sent after Sunday, April 7th will still be fairly reviewed by editorial staff, but won’t be eligible for the feedback/accelerated response time.

3) The manuscript you’re pitching must be new material, not previously published material, whether self-published or released via a publisher. New material only will be considered during this event.

4) The manuscript cannot be one that has previously received a pass letter from us.

5) You may pitch more than one project.

How to participate:

1) Wait until April 4th from 8am Eastern to 9pm Eastern, which is when the editors will be monitoring the hashtag.

2) Craft your compelling book pitch into one (no more than two) tweets. Indicate if it’s more than one tweet by using 1/2 and 2/2 so we can piece them together.

3) Post them to Twitter from your account using the #carinapitch hashtag (the only way we’ll know they’re for us!)

  • Please do not post pitches for one book more than twice during the #carinapitch event. Even if you’re changing your pitch, please pitch the same book no more than twice during the day.

4) Watch for a reply from a Carina Press editor.

5) If an editor lets you know that they’d like to see your submission and your manuscript is NOT currently on submission with us:

  • a) please follow the submission guidelines here and include all required information. Send your submission to the submissions email, not the editor directly.
  • b) Make your subject line: #carinapitch Title by Author (genre)
  • c) Address your query letter to the editor who requested your manuscript
  • d) At the top of your query letter, please include the Twitter pitch you used and your Twitter name (to help the editor recognize your request & verify that they asked for it)
  • If more than one editor asks for your submission, you may choose which editor to send to, though you may also wish to indicate the second editor who had interest, in case the first editor chooses not to read it.
  • e) Send your submission no later than Sunday April 7, 2013

6) If an editor lets you know they’d like to see your submission and your manuscript is already in our queue.

  • a) Send an email to submissions@carinapress.com
  • b) Subject line: #carinapitch Existing Submission
  • c) In the body of the email, please include the Twitter pitch you used and your Twitter name (to help the editor recognize your request & verify that they asked for it).
  • d) In body of email, please tell us the date you originally submitted your work, the title of the work, the genre and the name you submitted under. It’s helpful if your email comes from the same email address you used to submit the work.
  • If more than one editor asks for your submission, you may choose which editor to send to, though you may also wish to indicate the second editor who had interest, in case the first editor chooses not to read it.
  • e) Email us no later than Sunday April 7, 2013

Notes about #carinapitch

  • You don’t need to direct your tweet to a specific editor. We’ll all be monitoring the hashtag throughout the day. However, if you want to bring it to the attention of an editor you think it’s particularly suited for, you are welcome to do so. At the bottom of this post is a list of participating Carina Press editors and their Twitter IDs.
  • Please don’t post your pitch more than twice during the day. We know you want to make sure we see it, so we don’t mind if you post it at two different times, but please don’t post one book more than that. This includes not changing your pitch five times and posting it five different ways, please. Two pitches per book, so the hashtag doesn’t become cluttered and allows all authors equal opportunity to be seen. Thank you!
  • An updated list of what different editors are looking for will be posted here on the blog Monday. You can see editor bios here.
  • Information about what we publish, our submissions guidelines and specific FAQs can be found here.

Feedback is welcome! Please email us at generalinquiries@carinapress.com if ever you have specific, constructive feedback you’d like to share.

One last (very important) note:

Even if your pitch isn’t selected by an editor, that doesn’t mean your project isn’t right for us. In the end, it’s the words you write in the story that will get us to acquire the book, not the words you wrote for the pitch, so if you’ve written something we publish, please still submit it to us. Your chances of having the manuscript acquired are just as good as those whose pitches we single out!

*Permission to forward this post, use it on blogs and author forums is permitted.*

Participating editors:

Angela James @angelajames

Tina Burns @TinaBurns

Deb Nemeth @DebNemeth

Jeff Seymour @realjeffseymour

Elizabeth Bass @ElizabethBass

Melissa Johnson @MelissJohnson

Gina Bernal @GinaBernal

Alissa Davis @AlissaDenay

Mallory Braus @MalloryBraus

Meredith Giordan @MeredithGiordan

Megan Records @MeganRecords

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What makes you comment in reply to an article on a Blog?

I’ve been wondering about this a lot.  What makes you stop and comment on a blog article your read?  There are some people who comment all the time.

My top commenters are pretty much the same people.  Three of them switch back and forth duking it out for the “Top Commenter” honors on a daily basis.

Then a new name pops up, and they hang out for a while.  Some disappear.  Are they still reading?  I don’t know.

I don’t know why there is a Shakespeare guy next to this post, either.

I think maybe some people comment for the social-networking aspect, and some people are just looking for information.

Stop, read, and go.  I guess that’s okay too.

Does anyone else mull over this?  I guess I’m weird, but when I visit another blog, I usually like the person to know that I’ve been there.

It’s kind of like poking them with a sword, or leaving a message on someone’s desk.

“Hi!  I stopped by, and wanted to let you know I was here.  Catch ya later”.

According to my stats, I average 150 people visiting this blog every day.  (Crazy, isn’t it?)  I run an average of six to twelve comments per post, give or take a few here and there.  (Yes, a few have gone as high as 50 comments, but that’s not the norm)

That means 90% of people read, but don’t comment.  I’ve seen some people create Gravitar accounts just to comment.  That’s cool.  You don’t need to be a blogger to join in the fun.

So… If you are a commenter, what makes you comment?

If you don’t comment, are you just shy? 

Now, I am completely aware that the people who don’t comment probably still won’t.  But if a few of you do, it would be great!  If you are shy, and think “I don’t have anything to say” just type “Hi, I was here.”

Consider it your first step into the madness of Social Networking.

How do you feel about your Facebook page?

I admit, I am behind the times.  Facebook is not my friend.

I cannot use my knowledge of HTML to make it do what I want.  I can’t make it be what I want it to be.

Yes, I have a Facebook page.  No, I don’t really take care of it, and it shows.  As a yet to be published author, I have nothing definitive to promote, other than www.jennifermeaton.com, which I think I do reasonably well. (Proof is in the pudding… you’re reading this, aren’t cha?)

I’m just not really sold on Facebook’s value.

Why do I bring this up?

When I recently submitted my manuscript to a publisher, they asked a lot of questions relating to my “marketing value/expertise”.   One of them was the link to my Facebook page.  Ugh.

It was required, so of course I gave it to them, but this is the one part of my submission that I am not proud of.

Here is my pitiful Facebook page Author page interactive page

Does anyone have a Facebook page that I can copy they are proud of?  I’d love to see it.  Mine is sorely lacking.

The Significance of Social Networking. Blogging, Facebook, and Twitter

Circuitmart recently ran an article about research that was just done on Social Networking.  It focused on Twitter, and Facebook… not so much blogging, but the principles are similar.  If you’d like to see the article, you can click on the link below, but I’ll summarize for you.

http://www.circuitmart.com/mart/49609.shtml  (There is a 30 second commercial, followed by the 1 minute video presentation, or you can click “read more” to read the full article instead.)

What I found interesting is that they interviewed someone with 200 Facebook friends, and they asked them how many are really friends.  The answer was only 30.

I thought about my own personal Facebook account.  I actually know everyone I’ve friended.  Yeah, to be honest, many of them are people I went to high school with, who I barely even knew back then, but I DO KNOW THEM.

(By the way, don’t try to “friend” Jennifer M Eaton on Facebook… that’s not me.  Nope, I’m not a blonde.)  You can find me under Jennifer M Eaton – Author.  If you see Castillia’s fire in the profile picture, or an eye with the reflection of fire in it… that one’s me.  (Wow, that eye looks creepy when it’s not cropped into a square.  EEEK!

Anyway, I was thinking about how this relates to blogging.  This is my professional area.  Here, I have a lot of followers, but I’ve actually never met most of you.

Is that weird?  Well, no… it’s not.  That’s what social networking is all about.

Finding people who are seriously into writing is hard for most of us.  I’m in a local writer’s group, but the people I’ve learned the most from are the people I interact with everyday on the internet.  (I do get a lot out of small group writing workshops, though)

Through my connections on the internet, I find out about contests, seminars, training classes, resources, and I can get great advice anytime I need it, just by posting and asking for help.  When I didn’t have my own blog, I jumped onto Nathan Brandsford’s… and that site is always there for me to get additional advice from a broader spectrum of writers.

Social networking has helped me tremendously.  My novel wouldn’t be what it is today without it.  I have “friends” all over the world to help me out.  (The guy doing the art for my WEB Site is in Hungary… and he’s read my novel.  How weird awesome is that?)

Used to its full potential, networking is a great tool.  I don’t care if I haven’t met you.  If you are here, you are my friend.  Friends help each other out.

Friends cheer each other on.

Now, stop reading this insanely long post.

Get up off your butt and finish your novel. 

The world is waiting to read you!

More Blog Awards!

JMMcdowel just graced me with the “One Lovely Blog” award.  This is a nice one, because I will not have to spend all weekend researching who I should give it to.  Thanks so much!  Everyone please go and give JM a visit to bask in the lovelyness.

This one is an easy one for me, because I just visited 140 of my wonderful followers’ blogs searching for ones that were “creative”.  The one who stood out in my mind as “Lovely” belongs to the lovely and talented Natalie Hartford… and the pink will look “Lovely” on her Website.

Natalie’s blog is not only striking, but has a very professional appeal while keeping her whimsical tone (Warning:  Her post tonight is not whimsical, but that just shows her diversity.)

Please jump over to Natalie’s Sight, and wave some pink Pom Poms and sprinkle hot-pink fairy dust all over her in congratulations.

I was also re-blessed with the Kreativ Blogger award, and the Versatile Blogger award from the talented Whitney Carter  tonight (Who I could not find on Twitter.  Are you out there?)  Thanks, Whitney.  Jump on over to Whitney’s sight as well and give her a big hello from me.

Amend 1-22-12 :  I was awarded the Versatile Blogger award once more from Story Multiverse.  Quite a week for me.  Please hop over there and check out that blog as well.  Thanks so much!

Now, after several hours of watching my children in a wrestling match, I am off to bed.  Everyone is asleep but me.  Even my pampered poodle is asleep on the floor beside me.  My pillow is definitely calling me.

I’m back!

Well, I’m back, but I wasted all night trying to figure out Facebook.

Dang it!  I’m a writer not a Marketing Expert!  I at least have a Facebook page now, but there’s not much there, yet.  I’ll build up on it later.

I’m also working on the copy and artwork for my WEB Site.  We’re moving forward!

I’m still chewing some info that I want to blog about.  I have a few posts almost ready and will have them up in a few days.

It’s good to be home!